The ACLU uncovers the first known wrongful arrest due to AI error

The ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union) has forced the police to acknowledge a wrongful arrest due to an erroneous algorithm.

While it’s been suspected that documented racial bias with facial recognition algorithms has led to false arrests, it’s been difficult to prove.

On Wednesday, the ACLU lodged a complaint against the Detroit police after black male Robert Williams was arrested on his front lawn “as his wife Melissa looked on and as his daughters wept from...

Over 1,000 researchers sign letter opposing ‘crime predicting’ AI

More than 1,000 researchers, academics, and experts have signed an open letter opposing the use of AI to predict crime.

Anyone who has watched the sci-fi classic Minority Report will be concerned about attempts to predict crime before it happens. In an ideal scenario, crime prediction could help determine where to allocate police resources – but the reality will be very different.

The researchers are speaking out ahead of an imminent publication titled ‘A Deep Neural...

The EU’s privacy watchdog takes aim at Clearview AI’s facial recognition

The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) believes use of Clearview AI’s controversial facial recognition system would be illegal.

Clearview AI’s facial recognition system is used by over 2,200 law enforcement agencies around the world and even commercial businesses like Best Buy and Macy’s, according to a recent leak.

The EDPB has now ruled that any use of the service by law enforcement in Europe would “likely not be consistent with the EU data protection...

Police in China will use AI face recognition to identify ‘lost’ elderly

china lost elderly facial recognition face ai artificial intelligence surveillance chinese

Chinese police hope to use AI-powered facial recognition, in combination with the nation's mass surveillance network, to identify lost elderly people.

The country's surveillance network is often scrutinised for being invasive, but the ability to detect potentially vulnerable people helps to shift the perception that it primarily benefits the government.

Public data suggests around 500,000 elderly people get lost each year, the equivalent of around 1,370 per day. About 72...

AI tags potential criminals before they’ve done anything

British police want to use AI for highlighting who is at risk of becoming a criminal before they’ve actually committed any crime. Although it sounds like a dystopian nightmare, there are clear benefits. Resources and outreach programs can be allocated to attempt preventing a crime, stop anyone becoming a victim, and remove the costs associated with prosecuting and jailing someone. With prisons overburdened and space limited, reducing the need to lock someone up is a win for everyone....

INTERPOL investigates how AI will impact crime and policing

INTERPOL hosted an event in Singapore bringing leading experts together with the aim of examining how AI will affect crime and prevention. The event, organised by INTERPOL and the UNICRI Centre for AI and Robotics, was held at the former’s Global Complex for Innovation. Experts from across industries gathered to discuss issues and several private sector companies gave live demonstrations of related projects. Some technological advances in AI pose a threat. In a recent interview with Irakli...